Liar’s Winter by Cindy K. Sproles

It’s All About a Liar’s Winter by Cindy K. Sproles

Liar’s Winter? So you ask, what exactly is a Liar’s winter, and why was that title chosen for book two of my Appalachian series? If you live anywhere that gets snow, you mayunderstand this.

But unless you are from the heart of the Appalachians, you may have never heard this expression. I know you’ve seen those times, usually in late March to early April, when the air is still brisk yet the sun warms your face. A Liar’s winter is when the spring rain starts to fall and winter tries its last ditch effort to kiss the drops and make them into snowflakes. Spring is forgotten while the giant frosty flakes of winter cover the ground and trees with one of the most beautiful snows ever seen.

 A Liar’s winter is when the spring rain starts to fall and winter tries its last ditch effort to kiss the drops and make them into snowflakes.

A Liar’s winter is when winter fights spring to see who wins a little extra seasonal time. You may recognize it as the time when the groundhog sees his shadow and predicts six more weeks of bad weather. In the Appalachians, if the snow turns back to rain, winter loses and spring comes early. If the snow stays, then winter wins a little longer.

In the novel, Liar’s Winter, you have the opportunity to learn about mountain superstition. We can’t explain why the superstitions seem to rule, other than in the mid-to-late 1800’s, educated people were far and few between in the confines of the mountains. There was a love for God, but a lack of understanding of who He really is, so when things happened people couldn’t understand, superstition fell into play.

There was a love for God, but a lack of understanding of who He really is, so when things happened people couldn’t understand, superstition fell into play.

Lochiel Ogle was born with a port wine birthmark covering her cheek and neck. Because people didn’t understand such a severe marking, they could only assume it was bad. The mark of the devil. Touched by Satan, himself, the large red marks were said to be the burn from hell’s fire. Children who had these marks were believed to have been claimed by the devil. A child with this oddity was feared and misunderstood. Depending on how much religion their parents knew, a child with a stain would either be left in the woods to be the prey of wolves or hidden away from view— never knowing anything about life.

The mark of the devil.

In this novel, Lochiel is stolen away from her mother’s arms at birth, taken by a child who thought this baby would replace the one his momma lost. The family did not fear Lochiel or love her but reared her as a workhorse. When she’s attacked by her stepbrother and left for dead, Lochiel has her first taste of freedom. Her adventure to find what she never really understood she’d lost to begin with becomes her first journey in real life.

The family did not fear Lochiel or love her but reared her as a workhorse.

This is a novel that threads the love of God gently through its pages. It doesn’t preach but slowly teaches how the choices we make are what shape us into who we will become. We can choose to be good or we can choose to be bad. Either way—it is a choice. In this book, Lochiel learns truth and forgiveness— and ultimately what unconditional love is.

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I hope you’ll take time to read about Lochiel Ogle and her pathway to true freedom. Sit back and savor the beauty found in the coves and crevices of the mountain. Learn about Lochiel’s hardships, but experience her redemption along the way. Liar’s Winter is an Appalachian novel full of both adventure and hope.

Who am I to write this story?  

The Appalachian Mountains stretch from Georgia to Maine, and in the upper part of the summits and peaks, the people of the Appalachians make their home. Remote and quiet—a man either pulls his weight or starves when winter comes. It’s a culture unfamiliar to the average person, but one that is filled with loyalty, superstition, and believe it or not . . . religion.

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I was reared in the mountains of East Tennessee. My mother–one of seven children—knew what it was like to literally walk to school in knee-deep snow and wear shoes until her toes poked holes in the ends. My grandmother, a good woman but stubborn and determined to make her way, taught us the ways of the mountains.

Us kids were from middle class families and taught values—trained that riches were i

My grandmother, a good woman but stubborn and determined to make her way, taught us the ways of the mountains.

n the heart and not in what we owned. Folks paid their debts, shared what they had, and came to help when they were needed. It wasn’t until high school that I realized we really didn’t have much money. We were taught that everything we had was a blessing, and we were to be grateful for it all.

Though I never did without; I certainly did not realize my home-sewn clothes were not good enough for some people. My mother stitched every seam with love and the things she made were beautiful, but they weren’t expensive. So, when I ended up in a pageant my senior year of high school, I quickly learned that the beautiful purple dress with overlaid eyelet and pearl buttons would not meet the criteria for pageant wear. I was crushed. I suppose that’s when I, as my grandma would say, ‘pulled myself up by the bootstraps’ and decided the culture I was raised in was amazing. I am proud to be an Appalachian mountain gal.

I am proud to be an Appalachian mountain gal.

When folks ask me why I write Appalachian Historical, it’s an easy answer. I love the culture where people are who they are. You’re not measured by your wealth, but by the worth of what you invest in others. I want the average person to know what I understand about the people of the Appalachian Mountains. I want them to have a taste of the hardship, and the feeling of success which comes when the hardship is overcome. That’s why I write Appalachian Historical Fiction.

Cindy K. Sproles is an author, speaker, and teacher. She is the cofounder of Christian Devotions ministries, and serves as the managing editor for SonRise Devotionals and Straight Street Books (imprints of Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas). Cindy travels nationwide, teaching at writers’ conferences and at women’s retreats and conferences. She is a storyteller, and a writer whose heart flows on every page of her books.

The author of Mercy’s Rain, and Liar’s Winter, Cindy is an award winning, best-selling writer. Visit Cindy at www.cindysproles.com.

 

 

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